Tip: add a widget anywhere with the_widget()

February 28, 2011 | No Comments Yet

Here’s a very useful tip for everyone comfortable with customizing their WordPress themes: you can add any widget anywhere on your site, not just in your sidebar or widgetized areas, using the template tag the_widget.

Here’s the syntax:

<?php the_widget($widget, $instance, $args); ?>

This post by Shailan explains how to find the widget class name and arguments to use in the code. Refer to the Codex for the names of the default widgets. Want to create your own widget? Valums shows you how.

Leave a Comment | Tags: , , , , , ,

Download the WordPress Visual Cheat Sheet

November 6, 2009 | No Comments Yet

WordPress Visual Cheat Sheet

The WordPress Visual Cheat Sheet was created by Antonio Lupetti of Woork Up for all you hard core WP developers. This PDF file contains 5 pages worth of template tags and corresponding code examples, which should be a more convenient to look them up compared to the Codex.

A preview of the PDF is also up at Scribd. Check it out here!

Leave a Comment | Tags: , , , , , ,

33 social bookmarking codes for your blog

August 7, 2009 | No Comments Yet

ProBlogDesign has compiled a list of codes you can use for automatically saving your blog posts on popular social bookmarking sites such as Delicious, Digg, Facebook, StumbleUpon, Technorati, and more—33 all in all.

The codes are made especially for WordPress theme files, making use of post title and permalink template tags instead of having to install special plugins. The upside to this method is having complete control of what displays on your blog, plus it takes up less resources compared to a plugin version, like Sociable or ShareThis. Either way, social bookmarking is a popular and oft-recommended way to get your posts out there, so make sure you have this feature on your blog.

Leave a Comment | Tags: , , , , , ,

WPLookup: unofficial function and template tag reference

March 13, 2009 | No Comments Yet

WPLookup is a nifty tool and reference for WordPress designers and developers. It lets you enter a WordPress function or template tag and display the necessary documentation from the WordPress Codex. You can even add it as a search engine to your web browser of choice so it’s just much easier to access.

I can just imagine this becoming an official tool integrated into the WordPress site, and even having an API of sorts so you can plug it into text editors and such. Great potential here.

Leave a Comment | Tags: , , , , , , , ,