Mark Jaquith on WordPress and web hosting

May 17, 2010 | No Comments Yet

WordPress lead developer Mark Jaquith sounds off on the state of web hosting companies and their lack of support for the publishing software. He emphasizes two of the biggest issues WordPress users have when it comes to maintaining their installs: caching and security.

People ask me for hosting recommendations all the time. I have a few decent hosts that I’ll recommend, but I don’t have any hosts about which I can say “use them, because they know how to host WordPress, and they’ll support you.” I’d like nothing better than to have a dozen such hosts to recommend by this time next year. WordPress is here to stay, and it’s time for web hosts to adapt!

This is just the first of many voices from WordPress community leaders cementing an initiative for better WP support, as mentioned in the State of the Word at WordCamp SF 2010. I think the greatest lesson here is never to settle with just any web host. With so many choices out there and your own site and brand on the line, choosing a proper, WordPress-friendly host should be top priority. You can’t afford not to.

As for the web hosting companies themselves, it’s a great opportunity to improve their game and offer specialized services that help with the upkeep of their respective client websites. A win-win for all.

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The WordPress core team meetup

December 15, 2009 | No Comments Yet

Here’s an introductory video that tells the tale of the recently held WordPress core team meetup, which lasted for 3 days. Some of the biggest names in the WP community are featured: Andrew Ozz, Mark Jaquith, Jane Wells, Peter Westwood, Ryan Boren, Matt Mullenweg.

And here’s the list of topics they covered in the meetup:

Topics: Direction for the coming year(s), canonical plugins, social i18n for plugins, plugin salvage (like UDRP for abandoned plugins), WordPress/MU merge, default themes, CMS functionality (custom taxonomies, types, statuses, queries), cross-content taxonomy, media functions and UI, community “levels” based on activity, defining scope of releases, site menu management, communications within the community, lessons learned from past releases, mentorship programs, Trac issues, wordpress.org redesign, documentation, community code of conduct.

As you can see from above, there are tons of exciting things going on with the WordPress project right now, not just with developing new features for future versions, but also on improving the WordPress community as a whole. More than talk of new features, it’s even better to know that one of the strongest aspects that makes WordPress what it is today is not forgotten but brought to the forefront. Onward with the community, WP!

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